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Allard Pierson Museum
Allard Pierson Museum

Allard Pierson Museum

Oude Turfmarkt 127, Amsterdam, Netherlands

The Basics

This University of Amsterdam archaeology museum was established in the 1930s, after the university acquired a large collection of books and antiquities belonging to former professor Jan Six. The museum was originally set up in a smaller building, moving into the former Nederlandse Bank building in the 1970s. Today it’s a bit of an off-the-beaten path attraction, though many of the city’s sightseeing and attraction passes include admission to the museum.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The Allard Pierson Museum is a must-visit for anyone interested in archaeology and ancient civilizations.

  • You can book a variety of guided tours, led by archaeologists and students, for an additional fee.

  • The museum is accessible to wheelchair users, and there’s parking for people with disabilities in front of the entrance.

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How to Get There

The Allard Pierson Museum is located on Rokin Canal in the heart of Amsterdam, just steps from the Amsterdam Rokin tram and metro stops, and about a 10-minute tram ride or 15-minute walk from Centraal Station. Trams 4, 9, 16, and 24 all stop here.

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When to Get There

The museum is open from 10am to 5pm Tuesday through Friday and 1pm to 5pm on weekends. It’s closed on Monday (except during the two weeks around Christmas and New Year’s), Christmas Day, New Year’s Day, and King’s Day (April 27).

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Who Was Allard Pierson?

The museum’s namesake was the first professor of archaeology at the University of Amsterdam, where he also taught art history and modern languages. Allard Pierson was a leading thinker in the radical criticism school, a movement in theological academia that denied the authentic authorship of the Pauline epistles and believed that the historical existence of Christ was based in myth.

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