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Fell’s Point
Fell’s Point

Fell’s Point

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171 Reviews
Free admission
1724 Thames St., Baltimore, 21231

The Basics

The waterfront offers a salty maritime scene with promenades and city views, but the focus of Fell’s Point is Market Square and its 18th-century buildings, which today house boutiques and restaurants. Take a walking tour or ghost tour to learn more about the area and its history. Baltimore’s oldest standing residence, the Robert Long House, is available for tours by appointment. Before leaving the neighborhood, grab a pint in a historic pub or two, particular features of this inner-city enclave.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • More than 120 pubs dominate the nightlife in Fell’s Point.

  • Look for murals dedicated to the legendary jazz singer Billie Holiday, who lived in the neighborhood through the 1920s.

  • You will see Fell’s Point spelled with and without the apostrophe; this difference is dubbed “the Great Apostrophe Plague,” with residents undecided on the usage.

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How to Get There

Fell’s Point is located a short drive by car or city bus from Downtown Baltimore and the Inner Harbor. Hop-on hop-off bus tours, which cover top Baltimore sights, typically include a stop in historic Fell’s Point. The most scenic travel option is by ferry: Disembark at the Maritime Park terminal, situated off Thames Street.

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When to Get There

This walkable neighborhood is a worthwhile destination all year round, but check the calendar for seasonal events before you go. Every April, the Fell’s Point Maritime Heritage Festival (formerly known as the Privateer Festival) celebrates the area’s maritime history and 18th-century Baltimore with historic demonstrations and reenactments. Just a few blocks away in the Canton neighborhood, the Baltimore Seafood Festival is a must-do for foodies.

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Frederick Douglas and Fell’s Point

During the 1820s and ’30s, famous abolitionist Frederick Douglass worked as a caulker in Fell’s Point, which he discusses in his autobiography. At that time, one in six shipyard workers was African American, with many employed as caulkers; they eventually formed a trade union called the Association of Black Caulkers. Learn more about this great American’s life at the neighborhood’s Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Museum.

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