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Things to Do in Costa del Sol

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Gibraltar
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9 Tours and Activities

There’s really nowhere quite like Gibraltar: a little piece of England looking out from Spain to the coast of Africa with a rock fabled in ancient mythology and the only wild monkey population in Europe. Gibraltar was handed over to the British by Spain in the 18th century, and British it has remained ever since, despite Spain's best efforts to get it to accept its sovereignty. The famous Rock of Gibraltar is a chunk of limestone rearing up over the city and overrun by Barbary macaques—legend says that if these monkeys leave the rock, so will the British leave Gibraltar.

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Nerja Caves (Cuevas de Nerja)
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14 Tours and Activities

The enormous prehistoric Nerja Caves (Cuevas de Nerja) boast extensive grottoes, archaeological remains, and the world’s largest column, rising 105 feet (32 meters) up. The cave formations look like organ pipes, and the area’s evidence of human habitation stretches back 25,000 years to the Paleolithic Period. Galleries display artifacts, paintings, and skeletons unearthed since the caves were discovered in 1959.

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Frigiliana
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Medieval Frigiliana is a typically Andalusianpueblo blanco (white town) in the hills east of Málaga above the vacation paradise of Costa del Sol. Guarded by the remains of the 9th-century Moorish Lízar Castle, the village rises from its cliffside promenade and offers far-reaching panoramas of the Mediterranean coast.

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Benalmádena
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Extending from the foothills of Sierra de Mijas Mountains to Spain’s Costa del Sol, Benalmádena is a town in three parts. The whitewashed mountainside pueblo offers a glimpse into old Andalusia, while Benalmádena Costa features sunny beaches and a lively nightlife. Arroyo de la Miel comprises the residential area in between.

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Bioparc Fuengirola
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Bioparc Fuengirola isn’t your average zoo. That’s because it’s built around the concept of zoo-immersion, dropping visitors into the animals’ habitats instead of the other way around. With a focus on conservation, education and sustainability, the zoo is home to well-cared-for animals that live in the most optimal conditions possible.

The result isn’t just happy animals but also happy humans who feel like they’ve been whisked off to places such as Madagascar, Equatorial Africa, and Southeast Asia. Animals — ranging from crocodiles to tigers, gorillas, hippos and lemurs — all linger in native-like habitats, and are separated from park guests by natural barriers such as rivers, bridges and rocks. Visiting during summer? Come during the extended evening hours to witness some of the park’s more nocturnal residents.

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Tivoli World
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Tivoli World, the oldest, largest, and most popular amusement park on Spain’s Costa del Sol, sits atop a hill in Benalmádena. The park features more than 40 rides and attractions, as well as a 4,000-seat outdoor auditorium for daily dance performances. There’s even a Wild West “town,” complete with a Texas barbecue restaurant.

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Almunecar
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2 Tours and Activities

History and culture come together in Almuñécar, one of the Costa Tropical’s most appealing destinations. Admire the ruins of a Roman aqueduct, stroll through a Phoenician necropolis, and visit the 16th-century San Miguel Castle, before lounging on one of the town’s two dozen beaches or hiking into the surrounding hills.

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Selwo Aventura

Selwo Aventura brings a bit of Africa to Spain’s Costa del Sol. A departure from a typical zoo, this wild animal park—the largest in Spain—houses animals in naturalistic habitats. Among the park’s residents are lions, cheetahs, zebras, giraffes, gazelle, elephants, monkeys, and several bird species in Europe’s largest aviary.

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Salobreña
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Surrounded by sugar cane fields, the coastal town of Salobreña is considered among Spain’s most attractive little villages. It is situated along the shores of the Costa Tropical, where the old part of town rises to a 10th-century Moorish-castle-topped pinnacle, from which you can spy unparalleled views of the mountains and Mediterranean Sea. This upper, older part of town is also where, amidst Salobreña’s maze of whitewashed buildings and tunneled walkways, you’ll find the 16th-century church Iglesia de Nuestra Señora del Rosario, which resides on the site of a former mosque.

The village is also home to a newer, lower part of town, which is lined by five beaches, where water-bound activities such as scuba diving and kayaking are plentiful. Beyond just the pretty village and beach, Salobreña is a prime destination for fresh local cuisine, as well as cultural festivities. These include, among others, Holy Week, and the celebration of the city’s patron saint, Nuestra Señora del Rosario, which takes place in October and includes a locally popular pilgrimage.

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