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Things to Do in Hungary

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Budapest Danube River
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The Danube River is the frame of all the best Budapest views, the dividing line that gives the city its dual character, and the second longest river in Europe. If it weren't for the Danube River, Budapest wouldn't have its famous series of bridges, including the Széchenyi Chain Bridge, adorned by lions, and the Liberty Bridge, adorned by turuls. And if it weren't for the Danube, there would be no Margaret Island, one of the city's most beloved sites for summer picnics and music festivals. Beyond Budapest, the river curls into a series of highly picturesque curves, winding its way past a series of towns popular as trips from the capital. There's Esztergom with its religious history and impressive basilica, Viségrad with its hilltop castle, and Szentendre and Vác with their Southern European appeal.
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House of Parliament (Országház)
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Not many cities can boast a Parliament Building this photogenic. Sitting on the banks of the Danube, built in a grand Neo-Gothic style, this is Parliament done palatially. The idea for the construction of the Budapest Parliament House - or Orszaghaz - came in 1873 when the three cities that made up Budapest were united. A competition was held and won by Imre Steindl. His design mixed Gothic, Medieval and Baroque elements with a lavish hand. The building was not finished until 1902, by which time Steindl was blind. The grand building contains many items of interest, including frescoes; the Hungarian Coronation Regalia with its Renaissance sword; mythical eagles and an impressive staircase.
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Buda Castle (Budai Vár)
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The grandiose pile of the Királyi Palota (the Royal Palace) is the Phoenix of Budapest - it's been burnt to the ground and rebuilt countless times, and was almost gone in WWII. But these days, looking at the magnificent stone edifice and haughty dome, it's hard to believe it was ever in jeopardy. Three of Budapest's premier museums are housed in the Royal Palace. The Hungarian National Gallery has rooms of paintings by Hungarian artists ranging from medieval times through to the 20th century. The Budapest History Museum is famed for its Gothic rooms and statues, unearthed in the 1960s during a renovation of the castle. The National Library holds a collection of all Hungarian works. The gardens offer sweeping views down Castle Hill, and various statues. Follow the groups of tourists to the Matthias Well, a Romantic extravaganza of a fountain with the figure of the young King Matthias as a hunter with his stag, and his beautiful beloved with her doe.
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Matthias Church (Mátyás Templom)
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Matthias Church, with the bright color of its tiled roof and its fantastic Neo-Gothic ornamentation, is one of the stand-out attractions of Castle Hill. Most of it dates from the late 19th century, but parts of the church are much older than that. It's named the Matthias Church because King Matthias I married Beatrice of Naples here in 1474.

It was here, in 1867, that Franz Liszt's Coronation Mass was first performed, and the church still has a strong musical tradition; try and catch a concert here if you can. On the exterior of the church, check out the unusual diamond-patterned tiles of the roof and the Matthias Tower, which bears the king's crest animal, a raven with a gold ring in its beak. Also look out for the medieval columns on the bottom of the Béla Tower, with their studious monks and devilish animals. Inside the church you'll find rich frescoes and a legendary Madonna statue - this Virgin is said to have saved the Castle from Turkish invasion when her face.

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Chain Bridge (Széchenyi Lanchid)
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Budapest’s Chain Bridge was the city’s first – and is still its most famous – crossing of the Danube, connecting Baroque Buda on the western river bank with the wide boulevards of Pest on the east. Opened in 1849, the bridge is 375 meters long and 16 meters wide; it is made of made of stone slabs and suspended in place by two massive linked iron chains. Originally a toll bridge, it was designed by English engineer Alan Clark, who also had a hand in Hammersmith Bridge across the River Thames in London. The stone lions guarding both ends of the Chain Bridge were carved by János Marschalkó and added in 1852.

From the Buda side of the Chain Bridge a road tunnel leads northwards underneath Castle Hill; as the bridge united the east and west sides of the city it was indirectly responsible for Budapest’s rapid flowering as a major metropolis in the late 19th century.

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Gellért Hill (Gellert-Hegy)
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Gellért Hill is one of Budapest's most romantic nights out. Just grab a bottle of the city's famous red wine, a couple of glasses, and your beloved. It might be a bit of a trek up there, but the view of twinkling lights will amply reward you.

The views you'll see over the Danube are best seen from the Citadel, built by the Austrians after their victory over the Hungarians in the 19th century. In fact, the monuments on Gellért Hill all have a somewhat painful history.

The girl posing with the palm of victory symbolizes the Russian liberation of the city after WWII, but as the liberation turned into an occupation, its presence has been disputed.

And Gellért himself? A martyred saint whose efforts at conversion ended with him being killed by angry pagans in a nail-filled barrel rolled down the hill (ouch!). He's commemorated by an immense statue.

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St. Stephen’s Basilica (Szent István Bazilika)
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This beautiful neo-classical cathedral is the biggest church in Budapest and sits on the imposing square of Szent István. Its serene façade is decorated with statues of the 12 Apostles and has twin clock towers, a vast cupola and an imposing colonnaded doorway leading on to a barn-like interior illuminated through jewel-like stained-glass windows.

Among the carved wooden pews, marble statuary, frescoed ceilings and gilded ornamentation, the opulent basilica’s most holy relic is found in the small dark chapel to the left of the elaborate main altar. The mummified and bejeweled hand of St Stephen, who was both first king and patron saint of Hungary back in the ninth century, lies preserved in a delicate glass cabinet. The basilica can accommodate 8,500 worshippers and was built during the late 19th century during the expansion of Budapest for the Millennium celebrations. Much of the later design work was by Miklós Ybl, designer of the Hungarian State Opera House.

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Heroes' Square (Hosök Tere)
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At the entrance to Budapest's City Park, Heroes' Square (or Hősök tere) features an impressive semi-circular sweep of columns and statues and a cenotaph honoring the fallen of the 1956 uprising. On either side of the square are the Museum of Fine Art and the Exhibition Hall, which now shows contemporary art.

At the peak of the semi-circle is a statue of the Angel Gabriel bestowing the Hungarian Crown on St. Stephen. Lower down is a rugged band of chieftans on horses with antler bridles - this is Árpád and other leaders from an early Magyar civilization. Other statues represent various leaders and statesman as well as abstract values like war and peace.

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Margaret Island (Margit-Sziget)
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Margit-sziget (Margaret Island) is a magical little piece of heaven poised between Buda and Pest. Being there always gives you the sense of taking some time off from the real world. It's small - only 2.5 km (1.4 mi) long - but you'd be surprised how much the island manages to pack in and still feel like an oasis.

Margaret Island was once three islands; they were put together to stem the flow of the Danube in the 19th century. In the middle ages, Margaret Island was called the Island of Rabbits. It was named Margaret after a saint who lived in one of the many nunneries. The Ottoman rulers kicked out the monks and nuns and took over the island for their harems. There's still plenty of lolling about and pleasure seeking to be done on the island today. It has a pool and lido, a thermal spa, concerts and a Japanese garden to help you relax.

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More Things to Do in Hungary

Castle Hill (Várhegy)

Castle Hill (Várhegy)

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Castle Hill is Budapest's most spectacular - and most visited - district. In one small area you have most of the city's big-hitter attractions, including the Royal Palace with its museums and library, the Matthias Church, the Fisherman's Bastion and several spectacular statues. The views over the Danube to Pest are incomparable and worth the trip alone.

Castle Hill has been settled since the 13th century, and you can still feel the scale of the medieval in its steep twisting streets and little square. It's watched over by a magnificent golden turul - the mythical eagle that is featured in Hungarian mythology. As you come up by funicular, the turul is practically the first thing you see.

The Royal Palace also has its fair share of fantastical statues, including a fountain featuring the young King Matthias posing as a hunter. The palace contains the Budapest History Museum and the National Art Gallery as well as the National Library.

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Fisherman’s Bastion (Halaszbastya)

Fisherman’s Bastion (Halaszbastya)

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Sitting high on Castle Hill on the Buda side of the Danube River, Fisherman’s Bastion was built in 1905 as part of the ongoing celebrations of the thousand-years existence of the Hungarian state. It encompasses part of the original fortified castle walls and its terraces boast the best view points over the river and across to Pest. The bastion is a step away from several of Budapest’s big-hitting attractions, including the Royal Palace with its museums and library, Matthias Church and the Hungarian National Gallery.

Festooned with Neo-Romanesque lookout towers, equestrian statues, turrets and colonnades, the T-shaped bastion has two levels and wraps itself around Matthias Church. Architect Frigyes Schulek revamped the church and designed the bastion at the same time. The wide steps leading up to the bastion are scattered with neo-Gothic statuary and provide an impressive introduction to Castle Hill.

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Széchenyi Thermal Baths (Széchenyi Gyógyfürdo)

Széchenyi Thermal Baths (Széchenyi Gyógyfürdo)

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The lemon-and-white Neo-Baroque confection of the Széchenyi Baths is the perfect place for a palatial soak. It was built in 1883 - in those days it was known as the Artesian Baths - and was the first bath house in Pest, the more industrial and working class side of the city. It was converted into a permanent site in 1913, and received various additions, including a hospital. In the late 1990s it was thoroughly renovated. The pools are the deepest and hottest in the city. Inside you'll find swimming pools, thermal sitting pools, saunas, masseurs and the 'fancy pool' with its artificial waves and massage jets. There are some segregated areas but for most of the pools you'll need a bathing suit. Outside there are warm swimming pools that, even in winter, make a delightful place to look at the sky, revel in the warmth and watch old men playing chess in the water.
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Citadella

Citadella

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Rising 140 meters on the west side of the Danube, Gellért Hill is crowned with the fortified hulk of Citadella, which provides one of the best viewpoints in Budapest. From the ramparts there are far-reaching panoramas north to Buda Castle, and down the river to Széchenyi Chain Bridge, St Stephen’s Basilica and the Parliament House. Constructed by occupying Austrian forces in the 1840s, the citadel was loathed by the Hungarians, who tore down its fortified gates when the Austrians eventually left the city in 1897. Its 60 canon placements still remain, as do the six-meter ‘U’-shaped walls of the fort.

During World War II an air raid shelter was built in the Citadella, and this now houses a small museum about the war. In 1956, Soviet troops suppressed the Hungarian rebellion against Communism by firing heavy artillery from the fortress and Russian artillery is still scattered around the complex.

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Lake Balaton

Lake Balaton

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Lake Balaton is the largest lake in Central Europe at 48 miles (77 km) by seven miles (11 km) at its widest. Lying in the Transdanubia region of landlocked Hungary, it is the summer playground for all Budapest, a great freshwater expanse in the foothills of the Bakony Mountains about an hour’s drive outside the city.

The north and south shores of Lake Balaton are entirely different in character; the southern side is well developed, with a series of modern resorts strung beadlike along the beaches, while the north is wilder and volcanic, with fewer resorts. Chief among these are Keszthely, home of the ornate Baroque Festetics Castle, and the historic spa town of Balatonfüred. The distinctive, twin-spired church at Tihany stands high on its rocky peninsula, surrounded by reed lands, and there are wineries scattered along the northern hills, some dating from the 14th century and many open for sampling the wares.

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Andrássy Avenue (Andrássy Út)

Andrássy Avenue (Andrássy Út)

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The elegant boulevard of Andrássy Avenue was completed in 1885 as part of the expansion of Budapest under Emperor Franz Joseph I to celebrate the thousand-year anniversary of the state of Hungary. It connects the Pest-side city center at Erzsébet Square to the City Park (Városliget) and as a masterpiece of urban planning was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2002, along with Heroes’ Square.

Elegant townhouses lined the avenue and it became the preserve of wealthy bankers and the aristocracy. In order to conserve Andrássy’s architectural harmony, the city fathers decided to build a train line underneath the avenue. And so the Millennium Underground Railway opened, the first in continental Europe; it was first used to transport people from the city center to Városliget, which was the focus of the millennium celebrations in 1896.

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Hungarian State Opera House (Magyar Állami Operaház)

Hungarian State Opera House (Magyar Állami Operaház)

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Budapest’s main opera house is a lavish neo-Renaissance confection with an interior so ornate that it could only have been built at the height of the wealthy Austro-Hungarian Empire. The opera house was designed by the Hungarian architect Mikós Ybl, while the Baroque ornamentation, sweeping marble staircases, the frescoed ceilings, vast chandeliers, rich velvets and gilded tiers of seats in the auditorium were mainly contributed by Károly Lotz and Bertalan Székely. It opened with great fanfare on September 27, 1884, in the presence of the Habsburg Emperor Franz Joseph I and in time for the Millennium celebrations of 1896.

Gustave Mahler was director at the opera house between 1887-1891 and its reputation as one the world’s leading cultural houses was cemented. After decades of riding high on the international stage, the proud opera house fell into disrepair under the Communist regime in the 1970s.

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Tokaj

Tokaj

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Elisabeth Bridge (Erzsébet Híd)

Elisabeth Bridge (Erzsébet Híd)

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Several bridges cross the Danube River connecting Buda and Pest, the two sides of Budapest, Hungary. The Elisabeth Bridge was named after the Hapsburg Queen Elisabeth, who was the wife of Francis Joseph I. An international competition was held in 1894 for the design of the bridge, and construction began in 1897. The bridge was inaugurated on Oct. 10, 1903, and until 1926, it was the largest chain-type bridge in the world. Unfortunately Elisabeth Bridge was bombed by German troops towards the end of World War II, and it was the only bridge in Budapest so badly damaged that it had to be completely replaced. From 1960 to 1964, nearly two decades after the original bridge was destroyed, the new bridge was built in the same place to reconnect Gellért Hill on the Buda side to Ferenciek Ter on the Pest side of the city.

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Central Market Hall (Nagycsarnok)

Central Market Hall (Nagycsarnok)

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The Central Market Hall is the largest indoor market in Budapest, Hungary. The ornate building is more than 100 years old and has three stories filled with stalls. The roof is still original and is covered in colorful Zsolnay tiles. There are four other markets in Budapest that were built in the same style with similar roofs, and all five opened on February 15, 1897.

The market hall is frequently visited by tourists, though many locals shop here on a regular basis as well. There are stalls selling fruits and vegetables, Hungarian meats, fish, local cheeses, Hungarian herbs and spices, Hungarian wines and spirits, clothing, purses, accessories, and souvenirs. There are also a few restaurants where you can try local dishes such as lángos, which is yeast-based dough deep fried in oil and topped with different things like sour cream, cheese, and garlic. The Central Market Hall often holds special events featuring the cuisine of foreign countries.

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Eger

Eger

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Eger is the second largest city in northern Hungary and with a castle, thermal baths, historic buildings and great wine, it makes a perfect day or weekend trip from Budapest. Founded in the 10th century by St. Stephen, the first Christian king of Hungary, the city was destroyed by the Mongols in the 13th century and then rebuilt around a new stone fortress in the 14th and 15th centuries. After being ruled by the Turks for almost a century, the city prospered once again as part of the Habsburg Empire during the 18th century. A remnant of Eger’s Turkish rule is the Turkish minaret, which can be climbed for panoramic views of the city.

Among Eger’s most popular sights are its castle, an imposing 19th century basilica, the town’s main square and an 18th century baroque minarite church. The town is also well known for its red and white wines and is the third most visited city in Hungary.

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Vajdahunyad Castle (Vajdahunyadvár)

Vajdahunyad Castle (Vajdahunyadvár)

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The colossal Vajdahunyad Castle sits next to the boating lake amid the greenery of City Park (Városliget) and displays a joyous clash of Hungarian architectural styles. It was designed by Ignác Alpár to be a gigantic folly for the Hungarian millennium celebrations in 1896, but it was such a hit with the citizens of Budapest that it was granted a reprieve and its makeshift construction was rebuilt in stone.

Running the gamut of Romanesque to Renaissance architecture, the palace is gaily encrusted with towers, turrets, Gothic flying buttresses, portcullises, bridges and courtyards, happily borrowing features from other castles around Hungary and there are scores of neo-classical statues scattered in the grounds. Today Budapest’s Agricultural Museum is housed among the marble stairs, ornate décor, stained glass and vast chandeliers of the palace interior.

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Budapest Jewish Quarter (District VII)

Budapest Jewish Quarter (District VII)

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Hortobágy National Park (Hortobágyi Nemzeti Park)

Hortobágy National Park (Hortobágyi Nemzeti Park)

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Found among the rolling plains of Alföld in eastern Hungary, Hortobagy National Park is UNESCO World Heritage-listed for its unique puszta grasslands, marshes, meadows and Europe’s biggest salt plain lying close to the River Tisza. Covering 82,000 hectares, it is a landscape where time has stood still and ancient rural farming traditions are still practised.

Distinctive gray cattle with curly horns graze the grasslands along with hardy, long-horned, woolly racka sheep and hairy mangalica pigs, shepherded by farmers who were once largely nomadic. The local csikós – Hungarian cowboys – are known for their daredevil equestrian skills and regular riding displays are given at several stud farms in the park. Hortobagy is also a paradise for bird watchers; during fall, some 70,000 cranes break their migration in the park, where more than 340 species of bird have been spotted, including cormorants, herons and egrets.

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