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Antioquia Museum (Museo de Antioquia)
Antioquia Museum (Museo de Antioquia)

Antioquia Museum (Museo de Antioquia)

Carrera 52 # 52-43, Medellin, Colombia

The Basics

Travelers can visit the museum via a number of tour options. Take a tour dedicated entirely to Medellín’s diverse museums or, if you’re a lover of modern art, opt for a Fernando Botero walking tour that reveals areas significant to the artist. If you’re looking to explore the museum at your own pace, then booking a skip-the-line admission ticket is guaranteed to save you up to an hour of waiting in line.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The Antioquia Museum is a must-visit for art lovers and first-time visitors.

  • Be sure to stop by the café, which overlooks the parquet floor of Plaza Botero.

  • Beat the crowds by visiting the museum in the morning or evening before closing time.

  • Local restaurants surrounding the museum serve Medellín specialities such as bandeja paisa, a veritable meat feast.

  • It is recommended to start on the third floor of the museum and make your way down.

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How to Get There

To reach the Antioquia Museum by public transport, take metro line A to the Parque Berrio station. In front of the museum are the Plaza Botero and the Rafael Uribe Palace of Culture, so it’s easy to combine a visit to the museum with stops at those sights. For the most convenience, visit the museum as part of a walking or coach tour that includes return transportation.

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Trip ideas

How to Spend 3 Days in Medellín

How to Spend 3 Days in Medellín


When to Get There

The Antioquia Museum is open from morning until early evening. As the city’s most popular museum, it often hosts crowds at all times of day. If exploring Plaza Botero after dark, be mindful of your valuables as street crime is common in El Centro.

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The Turbulent History of Medellín

The unofficial reign of drug lord Pablo Escobar created violent conflict within the city of Medellín. During a 1995 concert in San Antonio Plaza, a bomb that was planted at the base of a Botero sculpture of a dove exploded and killed dozens of civilians. The destroyed sculpture now stands beside an identical and fully intact sculpture, providing a poignant reminder of Medellín’s turbulent past.

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