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National Civil Rights Museum
National Civil Rights Museum

National Civil Rights Museum

Mon, Wed–Sat: 9am–5pm (opens at 1pm on Sun)
450 Mulberry Street, Memphis, Tennessee, 38103-4214

The Basics

A must-visit for visitors looking to better understand this tumultuous period of American history, the National Civil Rights Museum is one of Memphis’ most popular attractions. As such, many sightseeing tours—particularly American Civil Rights and history tours—include a stop here, while others combine the museum with visits to sites such as the Stax Museum of American Soul Music or the Rock 'n' Soul Museum. Travelers who'd rather move at their own pace can also visit independently.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • This site is a must-see for history buffs.

  • Give yourself a minimum of two hours to experience the museum exhibits.

  • Flash-free photography is permitted.

  • Much of the museum is accessible for wheelchair users.

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How to Get There

The museum is situated in the South Main District in downtown Memphis, a short drive from most of the city’s other attractions. Free parking is available in a guest lot off Mulberry Street. It’s also a short walk from the Main Street Trolley line.

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When to Get There

The National Civil Rights Museum is closed on Tuesdays and most major US holidays. During the summer season between Memorial Day weekend and Labor Day, opening hours are extended in the evenings. On weekdays, school groups tend to arrive in the morning, so planning a visit for later in the afternoon can mean shorter lines and fewer crowds.

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Other Civil Rights Sites in Memphis

Alongside the National Civil Rights Museum, there are several other places to visit to learn about the civil rights movement in Memphis. Don't miss the Beale Street Historic District, site of historic riots; the Mason Temple Church of God in Christ, where Dr. King gave his "Mountaintop" speech; and the WDIA Radio Station.

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