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Things to Do in Rome - page 5

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Case Romane del Celio
9 Tours and Activities

It's awe-inspiring to walk through the ruins of ancient Roman temples and amphitheaters, but to bring history to a human level you've got see where those ancient people lived. You can do that at the Case Romane del Celio.

Underneath the Basilica of Santi Givanni e Paolo, the Case Romane del Celio is a network of ancient Roman houses. There are homes from different periods – one from the 2nd century, another from the 3rd century – and for different levels of society. There are beautiful frescoed walls and a small museum displaying some of the artifacts unearthed during the excavation of the site.

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Basilica of the Holy Cross in Jerusalem (Basilica di Santa Croce in Gerusalemme)
16 Tours and Activities

One of the Seven Pilgrim Churches of Rome, the Basilica of the Holy Cross in Jerusalem houses several relics from the Holy Land brought to Rome around 325 AD. The relics are said to be parts of the cross from the Passion of Jesus Christ — carried from Jerusalem by the mother of Roman Emperor Constantine I, the St. Empress Helena. The church name comes from the Jerusalem soil that was laid on the floor of the basilica, as a way of moving part of the holy city to Rome. Though it was once the Palazzo Sessoriano, the palace of the St. Empress Helena, it was later converted into a small chapel.

It has since been renovated and restored over the centuries to its Baroque style facade that exists now. Today visitors can see three relics enshrined: pieces of the True Cross, a nail from the crucifixion, thorns from the crown, and small pieces of the tomb of Jesus and the Holy Sepulchre. There is also a full size replica of the Shrine of Turin.

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Baths of Diocletian (Terme di Diocleziano)
10 Tours and Activities

Visitors to Rome are still able to visit what was once the grandest and most luxurious public bath or thermae in the ancient city. Built from 298 to 306 AD, at its largest it spanned nearly 32 acres and could accompany as many as 3,000 bathers. Bathing was a social event and ritual significant to Roman society. Rooms ranged from cold to warm to hot water, with saunas, swimming pools, and spas. Baths were not just a form of relaxation for ancient Romans, but a social and even political act where business often took place.  These massive baths were named in honor of Emperor Diocletian, who at the time hadn’t even visited Rome. The entire complex included a gymnasium, library, stadium, gardens, galleries, and walking paths. Though most of the structures were destroyed by Goths in 537 AD, some of the ruins remain. The Basilica of St. Mary of the Angels was built into the central bath area by Michelangelo in 1561.

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Doria Pamphilj Gallery (Galleria Doria Pamphilj)
10 Tours and Activities

The Doria Pamphili Gallery, located in Rome, Italy, is one of the largest and most magnificent palaces in the center of the city. It is home to the Doria Pamphili (sometimes spelled Pamphilj) family, and some members of the family still live in one section of the palace. The original building dates back to the 15th century, though it has been renovated several times. A visit to the gallery provides a glimpse into aristocratic life in Rome. Many private rooms are now open, including a ballroom, a chapel, and living quarters, all decorated with elaborate paintings and sculptures.

The art gallery itself contains approximately 400 pieces from the 15th to 18th centuries. Some of the more famous pieces include a portrait of pope Innocent X by Velázquez and two busts of the same pope, created by Bernini. The Gallery of Mirrors is one of the most lavish rooms in the palace and includes frescoes depicting the Labors of Hercules.

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National Roman Museum (Museo Nazionale Romano)–Palazzo Massimo alle Terme
10 Tours and Activities

The National Roman Museum has four locations in Rome, Italy, and one of them is housed in the 19th century Palazzo Massimo alle Terme near Termini train station. It contains one of the world's most important collections of Classical art. The museum has four levels with sculptures, frescoes, mosaics, coins, jewels, and many other items that show the evolution of Roman art from the Late Republican age through Late Antiquity. The art depicts ancient Roman history, myths, and the culture of every day life throughout several hundred years.

Some of the exhibitions in the National Roman Museum include Greek works that were discovered in Rome such as the Boxer at Rest, the Hellenistic Prince, portraits from the Republican and Imperial Ages, and the statue of Augustus Pontifex Maximus. Other pieces in the museum depict Roman battle scenes and other parts of Roman life.

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Castel Romano Designer Outlet
11 Tours and Activities

With some of the greatest luxury clothing brands, Italy is known for its fashion and shopping. Castel Romano Designer Outlet offers some of the best brands at up to 70% off of retail prices. There are over 140 stores for both women and men. There truly is something for everyone to shop for. Brands range from Italian designers like Alberta Ferretti, Moschino, and Versace to international brands such as Nike and Tommy Hilfiger.

Designed in a boutique style, the collection of shops was designed to resemble the structure of ancient Rome, and is fun to wander and browse outdoors. There are also dozens of restaurant, bar, and cafe options, a playground for children, and events taking place throughout the year. A beauty bar with facial and body treatments makes it easy to pamper yourself after a long day of shopping.

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More Things to Do in Rome

Via Margutta

Via Margutta

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10 Tours and Activities
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Orange Garden (Giardino degli Aranci)

Orange Garden (Giardino degli Aranci)

7 Tours and Activities

A lush garden overlooking Roman rooftops and domes, the Giarino degli Aranci was once an ancient fortress and now offers some of the best panoramic views of Rome. Full of orange trees, there are many benches and grassy areas to relax on and escape the bustle of the city. Views stretch across the skyline from Trastevere all the way toward St. Peter’s Basilica.

Legend says that Saint Dominic planted a single bitter orange tree in the courtyard of the nearby Basilica di Santa Sabina in 1200 AD. It is said to be the first orange tree in the whole of Italy, and today the gardens have a pleasant orange aroma from the groups of many trees.

Upon entering the gardens, visitors can see the face of Giacomo Della Porta's fountain, believed to have been made in reference to the river god Oceanus. Overlooking the Tiber River, it has been called one of the most romantic spots in Rome.

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St. Nicholas Basilica in Carcere (Basilica San Nicola)

St. Nicholas Basilica in Carcere (Basilica San Nicola)

9 Tours and Activities

The Basilica di San Nicola in Carcere is a church in Rome with an interesting history. It was built on top of three ancient temples, and pieces of these temples were incorporated into the facade of the current church. There are columns and other sections from the Temple of Spes dating back to 250 B.C., a temple that honored Juno from the 2nd century B.C. and rebuilt in 90 B.C., and the Temple of Janus, the god of gates and beginnings, dating to 17 A.D. Unlike most churches in Rome that took columns from other ruins around the city and moved them, the columns in this church still stand in their original location.

Since the ground level was much lower 2,000 years ago, some of the ruins of these temples are now underground. Visitors can take a tour beneath the church to see these ruins, which are older than many other ruins in the city. These ruins are Republican era, making them roughly 500 years older than the imperial era ruins in other parts of Rome.

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Pincio Gardens (Pincio)

Pincio Gardens (Pincio)

7 Tours and Activities

Overlooking Rome’s Piazza del Popolo, the gardens on Pincio Hill have been present since the time of the ancient Romans. It is named for the Pincis, a noble Roman family whose estate was built on these grounds in the 4th century. The gardens were separated from the neighboring Villa Borghese by an ancient wall.

Filled with greenery, flowers, and bust statues of famous Italians, the present gardens were laid out in the 19th century. Tree-lined avenues were once (and still are) a grand place to go for a stroll. There’s also an obelisk and historic water clock located in the gardens. They are accessed via a steep, winding path up from the city. Once at the top, you’ll have one of the best views of Rome, looking out to rooftops, piazzas, and St. Peter’s Basilica. The panoramic outlook is arguably best at sunset.

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Keats-Shelley House

Keats-Shelley House

7 Tours and Activities
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Piazza di San Cosimato

Piazza di San Cosimato

7 Tours and Activities
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Jewish Museum of Rome (Museo Ebraico di Roma)

Jewish Museum of Rome (Museo Ebraico di Roma)

5 Tours and Activities

Found in the basement of the Art Nouveau Great Synagogue of Rome, which was built across the River Tiber from the former Jewish ghetto in Trastevere and inaugurated in 1904, the Jewish Museum of Rome (Museo Ebraico di Roma) opened in 1960 and records 2,200 years of Jewish life in Rome. It was much expanded in 2004 and now seven ornate rooms house new displays of precious textiles, manuscripts and silverware as well as information on the Nazi occupation of Rome, liturgical vestments and tombstones moved from the catacombs underneath the city. An unusual aspect of the exhibition is the explanation of the contribution of Libyan Jews to Roman life when they were expelled from Tripoli in 1967. A further gallery displays marble fragments from the 16th–19th centuries that record elements of Jewish life, from the purchase of cemetery plots to the wills of wealthy families. The highlight of a visit, however, is undoubtedly the 3D virtual tour through the Jewish Ghetto.

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Domus Augustana

Domus Augustana

5 Tours and Activities

One of the many ancient Roman ruins atop the Palatine Hill is the Domus Augustana, part of the huge Flavian Palace, built for Emperor Domitian.

The Domus Augustana – sometimes called the Domus Augustiana – was the luxurious residence of the emperor (his official name was Titus Flavius Domitianus, hence the name of the palace). The palace complex was built in the late 1st century, and the Domus Augustana was lived in by emperors until about the third century. It's fairly well-preserved.

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Barberini Palace (Palazzo Barberini)

Barberini Palace (Palazzo Barberini)

4 Tours and Activities

Palazzo Barberini is a 17th century palace in Rome, Italy that now holds the National Gallery of Ancient Art. The museum contains an impressive collection of paintings and is a good alternative to some of the more popular and crowded art museums in the city. One of the paintings you can see here is Raphael's La Fornarina, which is a portrait of his lover, a baker's daughter. Also found here are Hans Holbein's portrait of King Henry VIII, Guido Reni's portrait of Beatrice Cenci who was beheaded for patricide in 1599, and Caravaggi's realistic portrayal of Judith beheading Holofernes.

Another big draw for this museum is the palace's Gran Salone. The ceiling of this huge ballroom was painted in 1630 by Pietro da Cortona, a master of Roman Baroque. The painting shows the Glorification of Urban VIII's Reign which includes a group of huge Barberini bees, the heraldic family symbol. There is a gift shop where you can buy souvenirs.

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Bioparco

Bioparco

4 Tours and Activities

Yes, Rome has a zoo. It is a zoological garden with more than 1,000 animals located on the original site of the Villa Borghese. Open since 1911, it began as a place to collect and display animals in danger of extinction. Paths winding through the park allow visitors to observe lions, elephants, tigers, monkeys, and giraffes, among others. There is also a small barnyard area with goats, pigs, cows, and other livestock. Most notably the bio-park is home to a rare Kleinmann’s tortoise, which was rescued from a smuggler's suitcase in 2005.

Bioparco has been renovated and renamed from its original construction to illustrate its commitment to ecological practices and scientific knowledge. There is a small lake with seating to relax as well as a children’s area. All in all there are more than 200 species on the 17 hectares of zoo land here. It is one of Europe’s oldest zoos still in operation.

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